Questions about recruitment at MediaCity should focus on 2016

The recruitment of staff to MediaCityUK continues to rumble on in the news, specifically the split between local and non-local results.

The Guardian continues the story, although without much conviction.

I think it comes down to this. The best outcome for Salford is that MediaCity is a roaring success and achieves all it can do to be a magnet for world class companies.

That can only happen if world class talent is attracted to work there and it is obvious that the talent pool in Salford or even Greater Manchester does not possess some magical and unique qualities that have hitherto been invisible to everyone, the workforce included.

Elements of the media would love to write ‘told you so’ headlines about the failure of the BBC’s Salford experiment, based on the idea that you can only be brilliant if you live and work in London.

Those headlines are going to be a lot harder to write a) if the quality of programmes improves and b) a lot of the ones making the programmes are recognisably the ones who used to make the programmes in White City or Broadcasting House.

I have written before that the real challenge for the BBC will come about three to four years after the BBC is really up and running, when the initial wave of talent, decides to move on to new jobs.

If by then the skills pool in Greater Manchester cannot meet demand then the BBC MediaCity experiment will face some bigger headlines.

Discussion

4 comments for “Questions about recruitment at MediaCity should focus on 2016”

  1. Hi Nigel,

    I know that this has been rumbling on across twitter for much of the day but I thought that I would express my views in more than 140 characters.

    I take on board what you say about its success being measured in four to five years and like you I hope that Greater Manchester and the North of England can share in that success.

    I don’t think the question is so much as to where the recruitment takes place,whether it is Salford,Manchester or Newcastle is largely irrelevant.

    What concerns me is two things.Firstly the overall figures on recruitment which were revealed on the Guardian’s Northerner site a week ago which are pretty pitiful.

    Now I have sat through many Peel/BBC presentations about how many jobs were going to be created.The last time I recall,the boss of Peel and the BBC managed to avoid answering the question which aroused my suspicions.

    The fact is that since those heady days when the project was first muted,the world has changed.First we have a massive fiscal deficit to bring down and the BBC like every other entity has had to cut its cloth.
    In a few years time,it may well no longer be the vast employer with global influence that is once was
    But secondly technologies have changed and many of the services that would have been physically based in the area,no longer need to be there.
    Some of the projections about the “related economy” are pie in the sky.

    But actually there is something more than the jobs that is more important in all this.

    Media city was sold as a community space with its doors open to all and embracing the new spirit of Salford.

    That I am afraid is far from the case.Instead we have a monolith with closed gates,numerous security people and sadly one of the most uninviting spaces I have ever been to and without mentioning names,many community groups have approached have been given short shrift.

    There has been a lot of bad and unjustifiable press over the move,but it is about time that people in Manchester started questioning this sacred cow.

    Posted by Nigel Barlow | January 23, 2012, 5:21 pm
  2. [...] Meanwhile, ” the real challenge for the BBC will come about three to four years after the BBC is really up and running, when the initial wave of talent, decides to move on to new jobs” says blogger Nigel Sarbutts. [...]

    Posted by LED Lighting News » Blog Archive » MediaCity on Monday: MP makes the case for Jeremy Hunt to follow the BBC north | January 30, 2012, 8:11 am
  3. [...] Meanwhile, ” the real challenge for the BBC will come about three to four years after the BBC is really up and running, when the initial wave of talent, decides to move on to new jobs” says blogger Nigel Sarbutts. [...]

    Posted by MediaCity on Monday: MP makes the case for Jeremy Hunt to follow the BBC north | TubeShaker | January 30, 2012, 10:07 am
  4. [...] Meanwhile, ” the real challenge for the BBC will come about three to four years after the BBC is really up and running, when the initial wave of talent, decides to move on to new jobs” says blogger Nigel Sarbutts. [...]

    Posted by MediaCity on Monday: MP makes the case for Jeremy Hunt to follow the BBC north - Property Cloud | March 31, 2012, 1:22 am

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